Head and neck radiology Head and neck radiology

Head & Neck

Offering expert diagnostic and therapeutic services pertaining to the brain, spine, head, and neck.

Head And Neck Radiology Services

AMI’s Expert Head & Neck team with global experience thrive to improve the patient outcome by deep technological expertise.

AMI provides expert diagnostic and therapeutic services pertaining to the brain, spine, head, and neck. Our head and neck imaging radiology service includes head and neck ultrasound and FNA/biopsy backed by the experience of having performed over 40,000 neck ultrasound examinations so far.

The wide scope includes providing diagnostic and interventional radiology procedures using MRI, CT, ultrasound, PET/CT, and intra-operative and functional MR imaging.

The Computational Neuroimaging Laboratory provides post-image processing and advanced analysis for all clinicians involved in the circle of treatment.

We also review complex MRI and CT examinations across various subsites of the head and neck region. Some of them being the sinonasal region, skull base, otology, maxilla-facial, salivary, oral cavity, pharynx, and larynx — including imaging of head and neck malignancies in the areas mentioned above. We also provide a radiofrequency thyroid ablation (RFA) service for symptomatic benign nodules.

Head and neck radiology services in india

How Head & Neck Imaging Reporting Can Improve Your Throughput Using Our Services

Quality

Reporting standards followed as per guidelines from the American College of Radiology (ACR) & The Royal College of Radiologists (RCR)

On-Time Reports

Reliable, and accurate reports with less turn-around time. 99% of the emergency reports are delivered in less than 1 hour.

24/7 Compliance

Internationally certified radiologists with Sub-specialty expertise are available 24×7 for 365 days a year.

FAQs

What is neck imaging?

Neck imaging refers to the use of various imaging techniques to visualize and assess the structures within the neck region. This includes the bones, muscles, blood vessels, nerves, glands, and other soft tissues of the neck. Neck imaging is commonly performed to diagnose and evaluate a wide range of medical conditions affecting the neck, such as neck pain, swelling, lumps, trauma, infections, and tumors. The imaging modalities used for neck imaging may include X-rays, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound, and nuclear medicine scans. Each imaging modality offers unique advantages and is selected based on factors such as the suspected diagnosis, the need for detailed anatomical information, and patient-specific considerations. Neck imaging plays a crucial role in the diagnosis, treatment planning, and monitoring of various neck-related disorders, helping healthcare providers to provide accurate and timely care to patients.

What is the best imaging for head and neck cancer?

The choice of imaging modality for head and neck cancer depends on several factors, including the location and extent of the tumor, the presence of metastases, and the need for detailed anatomical and functional information. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are commonly used as the primary imaging modalities for evaluating head and neck cancers. CT imaging provides detailed anatomical information about the bony structures and soft tissues of the head and neck, making it useful for assessing the extent of tumor involvement and detecting metastases to nearby lymph nodes or distant sites. MRI offers excellent soft tissue contrast and is particularly valuable for evaluating the extent of tumor invasion into adjacent structures, such as nerves, blood vessels, and the skull base. Additionally, functional imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) or PET-MRI may be used to assess tumor metabolism and detect distant metastases, aiding in staging and treatment planning. Ultimately, a multimodal imaging approach, often involving a combination of CT, MRI, and functional imaging, allows for comprehensive evaluation and staging of head and neck cancers, facilitating optimal treatment strategies and patient management.

What are the different types of neck scans?

Various types of imaging scans are used to assess the neck region, each offering unique insights into different structures and pathologies. Computed tomography (CT) scans utilize X-rays to produce detailed cross-sectional images of the neck, providing information about bones, soft tissues, blood vessels, and organs. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans use powerful magnets and radio waves to generate detailed images of the neck's soft tissues, including muscles, nerves, glands, and tumors, without exposing the patient to ionizing radiation. Ultrasound imaging employs sound waves to create real-time images of the neck's structures, such as the thyroid gland, lymph nodes, and blood vessels, aiding in the evaluation of masses, cysts, or abnormal lymph nodes. Additionally, nuclear medicine scans, such as thyroid scans or positron emission tomography (PET) scans, may be performed to assess metabolic activity, detect tumors, or evaluate thyroid function. Each type of neck scan has its advantages and is selected based on the specific clinical indication and the information needed for diagnosis and treatment planning.

Can CT scan detect neck cancer?

Yes, a CT (computed tomography) scan can detect neck cancer. CT scans are commonly used imaging modalities for evaluating the neck region, providing detailed cross-sectional images of the structures within the neck, including the bones, soft tissues, blood vessels, and organs. CT scans can detect abnormalities such as masses, tumors, enlarged lymph nodes, and other signs of cancerous growth in the neck area. Additionally, CT scans can help determine the extent of tumor involvement, assess invasion into adjacent structures, and evaluate the presence of metastases to nearby lymph nodes or distant sites. CT scans are often used as part of the diagnostic workup for suspected neck cancer, helping healthcare providers to accurately diagnose the condition, stage the disease, and plan appropriate treatment strategies.

What is a head and neck MRI?

A head and neck MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) is a non-invasive imaging technique that uses powerful magnets and radio waves to generate detailed images of the structures within the head and neck region. This imaging modality provides high-resolution images of the soft tissues, including the brain, skull, muscles, nerves, glands, blood vessels, and lymph nodes, without exposing the patient to ionizing radiation. A head and neck MRI can help diagnose and evaluate a wide range of medical conditions affecting the head and neck, such as brain tumors, stroke, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders, cranial nerve abnormalities, salivary gland tumors, and neck masses. It is particularly valuable for assessing the extent of tumor invasion, identifying metastases, and guiding treatment planning in patients with head and neck cancers. Head and neck MRI scans are often performed with or without contrast dye to enhance visualization of certain structures and abnormalities. Overall, head and neck MRI is an essential tool in the diagnostic workup and management of various head and neck conditions, providing detailed anatomical information to aid in patient care.

How long does a head and neck MRI take?

The duration of a head and neck MRI scan can vary depending on several factors, including the specific imaging protocol used, the complexity of the study, and whether contrast dye is administered. On average, a head and neck MRI typically takes approximately 30 to 45 minutes to complete. However, certain factors may extend the duration of the scan, such as the need for additional sequences or specialized imaging techniques to evaluate specific structures or pathologies. Additionally, if contrast dye is administered intravenously to enhance visualization of certain tissues or abnormalities, it may prolong the scan duration as time is allocated for the contrast agent to circulate through the body and reach the target areas. Overall, while the average duration of a head and neck MRI is relatively short, patients should be prepared for the possibility of variations in scan time based on individual circumstances and imaging requirements.

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